It All Began in Nebraska 10 Years Ago

The American Outlaws built a fan culture in the United States that rivals the best of them.

In many respects, the American Outlaws started it all. They were one of the first to harness the passion and energy of soccer fans in the United States and turn it into something that rivals the supporters in any other country.

Today, ten years after their beginning in 2007, they have brought together more than 30,000 members and united hundreds of thousands more through their chants, unique atmosphere and undying dedication to soccer in America.

But it wasn’t always an army of 30,000+ members.

The American Outlaws started when three friends from Lincoln, Nebraska noticed the untapped potential of soccer fans in the U.S. As they describe it, “There was a lack of consistency from game to game with regards to the level of supporter organization and communication, particularly with events surrounding the game for fellow fans to meet up.”

As they describe it, “There was a lack of consistency from game to game with regards to the level of supporter organization and communication, particularly with events surrounding the game for fellow fans to meet up.”

That realization sparked an idea, and that idea turned into a nonprofit supporters group, the American Outlaws. In 2007, a few dozen fans traveled together for the Gold Cup matches to display a united front in support of the U.S. Men’s National Team. In 2010, they setup the first travel package for members to attend the FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

Four years later, in large part to their devoted traveling fan base, the United States boasted the #1 fan base for travelers to the World Cup in Brazil.

Today, you can find groups of American Outlaws in more than 175 cities across the country. From game watches at bars, to tailgates and marches outside every stadium the team plays in, the American Outlaws have cemented their place in U.S. soccer culture.

The American Outlaws are part of the best fans in the world.

Learn more about the group’s history:

 

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: